Postgraduate Writing

Welcome to my Postgraduate Writing space. Here, I will take the time to showcase research assignments I have done relating to my academic and professional interests during my postgraduate career.

Note: If you encounter any trouble viewing these documents, click on “View this document on Scribd.”

Ensuring a Stable and Denuclearized Korean Peninsula

This essay is a policy brief written for the course International Peace and Security. In fewer than 1500 words, I was tasked with identifying a problem relating to International Security policy, considering multiple policy options, and ultimately recommending one policy for the UN Security Council. It was difficult to condense a topic as complex and important as the Korean Peninsula to such a small space, but it was a rewarding experience and an excellent start to my UCL academic career.

The Tactics, Goals, and Outcomes of the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam

For this essay, which was the final essay for the Terrorism course, I chose a terrorist organization, explained their background, identified their tactics, and analyzed how successful they were in achieving their goals. The group I chose was the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam, more commonly known as the Tamil Tigers or LTTE. One fascinating aspect of this essay was that the analysis of the group’s success was from the perspective of not only the government’s prevention of terrorism, but from the group’s perspective as well. Examining the issue from multiple angles allowed me to have a more complete view of the LTTE and the issues at stake more broadly with terrorism.

The Invasion Of Iraq As The Case Against Preemtive Self-Defense

This essay was written for the course War, Peace, and Human Rights. The exact prompt for this essay (chosen as one prompt out of a choice of 15) was “Can pre-emptive self-defense ever be justified? Discuss in relation to the intervention in Afghanistan, Iraq or Iran’s nuclear program.” The fact that a significant portion of this essay was dedicated to analysis of international humanitarian law, a subject with which I had not had much prior experience, made this a challenging assignment. Ultimately, though, it was a rewarding experience, and I think I did an excellent job at examining the issue from a legal and moral perspective.

Ethnic Party Bans and Territorial Autonomy: Managing Ethnic Conflict

I was tasked with analyzing different methods of managing ethnic conflict through electoral institutions for my final essay for the Governing Divided Societies course. I focused on two systems designed to promote democratic consolidation and prevent ethnic conflict: ethnic party bans and territorial autonomy. An interesting facet of this assignment was that, prior to beginning my research, I had hypothesized that ethnic party bans would be a better institution for preventing ethnic conflict than territorial autonomy. However, as I researched for the essay, my hypothesis was proven false. It’s important to remember that your initial thoughts can be incorrect and not to let them cloud your judgement.

Dissertation: Terrorist Organizational Success, Violence, and State Sponsorship

My final assignment for my MSc Security Studies program at University College London is an independently researched dissertation. The topic I have chosen to research is the role of state sponsorship with terrorist organizations, and how state sponsorship could affect a group’s success, level of violence, and other issues. It is the culmination of several months of work, and it is the single piece of academic writing of which I take the most pride. It is presented here in full.

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